Instructions on how to put together a simple motion detection appartus using an infrared sensor and radio frequency communications.

AI needs some basic calls and responses. Here I go over a couple of the important ones.

Where does a AI get its knowledge? From the internet! Here I show how to connect up to Wikipedia and WolframAlpha to have access to incredible amounts of knowledge!

The Raspberry Pi doesn’t have a lot of processing power. How do we assign intensive tasks like audio/visual systems? Here’s a simple howto on just that.

As I mentioned in the first post, I am using the CM19A to control some of my X10 Transceiver Modules. This could not be any simpler so let me describe how I do it: Before you plug in the CM19A, simply install mochad. bbx10node has a great blog on how to get it setup. One […]

Update 02/12/2014: I made a slightly better version using graphics that implement a little bit of the actual mouth movements (see here for code): So for a face, I thought I would try making some sort of realtime voice animating system. I made a very very simple one in python. Here is an example of […]

This part is actually very easy – there is a fantastic API already available that does the job. Use this API and then all that needs to be done for the AI program is creating a function that feeds in the query to the robot and gets the response: In this example I use CLEVERBOT […]

The information from Wolfram and Wikipedia is in a section about Declarative knowledge which I’ll be posting up soon.

Once again, this will be short and sweet. The code here is the most simple, it does not save any of the processed images. If people are interested in that I can post code that will save images of the faces with their features labeled, but I am excluding that now for clarity. Here is […]